Understanding the medieval battle for Uttar Pradesh

Last week we learnt, from a perusal of an Association for Democratic Reforms (ADR) report, that out of the 617 candidate names released in the first list, 31% and 15% had criminal cases and serious criminal cases registered against them. If you thought this was sobering, the news gets better with ADR’s addendum report on …

Continue reading

Top Takeaways from Banerjee and Duflo’s Poor Economics

If you’ve been following this blog for sometime, you know that I consider Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s Poor Economics as a bible of sorts — to understand poverty, understand the psyche and motivations of the extremely poor, and the power of Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) to fairly assess efficacy of anti-poverty programs. Several posts …

Continue reading

The curious history of conditional cash transfers

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth in a series of six excerpts from chapter 4 (education policy) of Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s Poor Economics. According to World Bank, more than 30 countries have some form of Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) programs.] In a recent interview, Harish Hande (Founder of SELCO) and 2011 Magsaysay Award …

Continue reading

Pratham’s Contributions to Indian Education Policy Debate

[Editor’s Note: This post is the fourth in a series of six excerpts from Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s Poor Economics, specifically from chapter 4 (on education policy) – Top of the Class. The first three excerpts covered the debate between the supply-wallahs and demand-wallahs. The fourth covers the strong contributions of Pratham (possibly India’s largest …

Continue reading

Middle ground between the supply-wallahs and demand-wallahs

[Editor’s Note: This post is the third in a series of six excerpts from Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s Poor Economics, specifically from chapter 4 (on education policy) – Top of the Class. Part 1 provided the supply-wallahs perspective, Part 2 was the counterpoint from the demand-wallahs. This post presents the middle ground.] At the core …

Continue reading

The Supply Demand Wars in Education Policy – Part 2

[Editor’s Note: This post is the second in a series of six excerpts from Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo’s Poor Economics, specifically from chapter 4 (on education policy) – Top of the Class. Part 1 provided the supply-wallahs perspective. This excerpt provides the demand-wallahs perspective.] The Demand Wallahs’ Case For the “demand wallahs”, a set of …

Continue reading